Women’s News: Women And Alcohol: Does Mixing Drinking With Work Help Or Hinder Your Career?

Women’s News: Women And Alcohol: Does Mixing Drinking With Work Help Or Hinder Your Career?

Women’s Health: Soda Consumption Linked With Higher Depression Risk In Study (And The Opposite Goes For Coffee)

Women’s Health: Soda Consumption Linked With Higher Depression Risk In Study (And The Opposite Goes For Coffee)

A Message From The Creator

A Message From The Creator

A Message From The Creator

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Women’s Health: Soda Consumption Linked With Higher Depression Risk In Study (And The Opposite Goes For Coffee)

New York City Board Of Health Approves Bloomberg's Over Sized Sugary Drink Ban

What you drink could be linked with how you feel, according to new research.

A study presented at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Neurologysuggests an increased risk of depression from drinking sweetened beverages, as well as a decreased risk of depression from drinking coffee.

Specifically, researchers found an association between drinking four cups/cans of soda daily and a 30 percent higher risk of depression, as well as an association between drinking four cans of fruit punch daily and a 38 percent high risk of depression. The effect was more pronounced with diet fruit punch/soda, compared with non-diet versions of the drinks.

Meanwhile, researchers found an association between drinking four cups of coffee daily and a 10 percent lower risk of depression.

“Our research suggests that cutting out or down on sweetened diet drinks or replacing them with unsweetened coffee may naturally help lower your depression risk,” study researcher Dr. Honglei Chen, M.D., Ph.D., of the National Institutes of Health in Research Triangle Park, said in a statement. “More research is needed to confirm these findings, and people with depression should continue to take depression medications prescribed by their doctors.”

The findings are based on beverage consumption and depression data taken from 263,925 adults, ages 50 to 71. Researchers followed them from the start of the study — between 1995 and 1996 — for about 10 years; at the end of the study period, 11,311 people had been diagnosed with depression.

Of course, researchers only found an association; it’s unknown whether people with depression then drink more sugary drinks, or if sugary drinks spur the depression; likewise with coffee. Because the study has yet to be published in a peer-reviewed journal, the findings should be considered preliminary.

But still, other studies have come to similar conclusions. Health.com reported on a study published in 2011 in the Archives of Internal Medicine, also showing an association between caffeinated coffee consumption and decreased depression risk. And an Australian study suggested a link between drinking soda daily and an increased risk of psychological distress and depression.

Read More:  http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/01/08/soda-depression-coffee-sweetened-beverages-drinks_n_2427150.html?utm_hp_ref=women&ir=Women

Women’s News: Women And Alcohol: Does Mixing Drinking With Work Help Or Hinder Your Career?

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The Huffington Post  |  By 

Two things about drinking in the workplace have changed since the Mad Men-era standard of downing five glasses of scotch before noon.
1) You would probably be fired if you attempted to work sloshed.
2) It isn’t just male professionals drinking on the job anymore.

In this era of greater gender equality — and less workplace debauchery — is it helpful or detrimental for women to drink with their colleagues? This is the question theAtlantic‘s Alexandra Chang posed on January 7th.

Chang said she rarely drinks at work events and “tend[s] to avoid situations where drinking is likely to be happening” but worries that she’s missing out on potential bonding with her coworkers as a result. A friend of Chang’s who also passes on alcohol at work concurs recalled that one female colleague wouldn’t even talk to her until she attended a work-related drinking event. Chang suggested that the pressure to drink may be greater for women working in male-dominated fields like finance and technology.

But the consequences of drinking may also be greater for women, she noted. If women who choose office sobriety run the risk of missing out on coworker bonding, they also avoid the potentially negative consequences of having one drink too many. (After all, no one wants to make a fool of themselves in front of their boss.) Leah Epstein, founder of the website Drinking Diaries told Chang that mixed-gender workplace functions hold extra concerns for women. “A woman drinking with a group of men in a work-related situation could cross into flirtation and the sexual. She might be stigmatized,” Epstein said.

Read More:  http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/01/08/women-and-alcohol-drinking-at-work_n_2433652.html?utm_hp_ref=women&ir=Women

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